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Birth control.  Contraceptives.  Family planning.  No-baby pills.  Whatever name you prefer, there are a myriad of options available to help you navigate safe, consensual sex and even reduce some of the uncomfortable symptoms of your menstrual cycle.  Here, we’ll review several types of contraceptives, their pros and cons, and average price points.  So, let’s get started!

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Condoms

Let’s start with the very basic contraceptive.  Condoms are a one-time use method of protecting yourself from Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and unwanted pregnancy.  They are available at any local pharmacy, grocery store, or even gas station.  They are easy to find if needed, and relatively inexpensive.  While condoms have a 98% effective rate when used consistently and correctly, they do have risks involved.  Based on human error and usage patterns, condoms are actually only 85% effective in preventing pregnancy.  There are several reasons the actual use rate is much lower for condoms than the perfect use rate: it can be hard to detect a problem with a condom before you use it, the user must have some basic knowledge of how to wear one for it to be truly effective, and many people find condoms uncomfortable or feel like they dull the sensations during intercourse.  They also can slip or tear, requiring you to change condoms during intercourse, and can spill or leak after use if not removed correctly.

Condoms are a viable option for many sexually active people, and are a great backup method to other contraceptives.  They also are key for people who are not currently monogamous, as they prevent STIs as well–the only method of birth control to do both.

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Works both to prevent pregnancy and STIs, common and easy to find, relatively cheap, and effective.

Cons: User error is more likely, can be uncomfortable or dull sensations, need to be kept on hand and expiration dates must be checked before use.

Price: Condoms average at about $1.00 each.  They are also available for free at many sexual health clinics and doctors’ offices.

 

The Pill

The first thought most people have when they hear ‘birth control,’ is the pill.  The pill is a daily medication that contains two hormones–progestin and estrogen.  These combine to ‘trick’ your body into believing you are already pregnant, so your ovaries will not release any eggs during your cycle.  For most forms of the pill, you take one pill at the same time every day for 3 weeks.  During the 4th week, you take placebo pills to bring on your period.  Some forms of the pill allow you to take pills continuously for 3 months before taking the placebo pills.  The pill has many positive aspects–it can reduce acne and lighten and shorten your period.  It also may possibly reduce the risks of ovarian cancer, anemia, pelvic inflammatory disease, and ovarian cysts.  However, the hormones in the pill can also have negative side effects: your weight may go up or down, you may experience migraines, some spotting throughout your cycle is possible, and it could increase or decrease your libido.  Hormonal birth control is always a bit of a shot in the dark for those starting it for the first time.  Many women love the pill, but many women hate it.  There is a wide range of hormone levels available now, and it may take some trial and error to find the right combination.

Also important to note about the pill is that it requires daily use–at the same time, every day.  In my experience, many women set an alarm on their cell phone to remind them to take the pill each day.  This is a fairly high effort birth control method, but if you can sustain the habit of taking it at the same time, then it’s a great option for people looking for hormonal birth control.  The effective rate of the pill is 99.7% in perfect use cases, but hovers around 92% in actual use cases–this change is likely the result of not taking the pill at the same time every day, or forgetting to take the pill at some point during your cycle.

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Allows for reduced condom use (for those using condoms to prevent pregnancy), reduces acne, lighten and shorten periods.

Cons: Mood changes, weight gain, and migraines are possible side effects.  Available by prescription only, requires daily use.  May require trying several brands before finding one that works.

Price: In the United States, if you have health insurance, your birth control should be fully covered by insurance under the Affordable Care Act.  However, the copay costs and out of pocket costs can range from $15/month - $50/month.  

An important note for women on the pill – there are many combinations of hormones available, and most women will try several different brands before settling on the pill that’s right for them.  Under the current law, brand-name medications will have copay if there is a generic version available.  However, if there is no generic available, or if your doctor has determined that the generic would not be medically appropriate for you, your insurer must provide the same coverage they do for the generic brand.  If your insurer denies you coverage for your pill, it would be wise to appeal the copay and ask your doctor to verify with your insurer that the medication you were prescribed is indeed necessary and a generic would not suffice.

 

Nuvaring

The Nuvaring is another method of hormonal contraception.  It’s a flexible plastic ring placed into the vagina once per month, available by prescription only.  It uses both progestin and estrogen to prevent the ovaries from producing mature eggs.  Nuvaring is a great alternative for women who have a hard time remembering to take their pill on time or every day (much like me), and also reduces how often you need to worry about your birth control.  You wear the ring for 3 weeks, remove it for 1 week for your period, and then reinsert a new ring for the next month.  Much like the pill, Nuvaring can reduce acne and lighten and shorten your periods.  Also much like the pill, Nuvaring can result in migraines, mood changes, weight gain, and decreased libido.  Because it is placed inside the vagina, the Nuvaring also can cause vaginal discomfort or irritation, discharge, and abdominal pain.  It’s not approved for use by women with high blood pressure or who smoke over the age of 35.  It also does not protect against STIs.  It’s effective rate is 99.7% in perfect use cases, and around 92% for actual use cases.

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Allows for reduced condom use, reduces acne, lighten and shorten periods, is a monthly medication instead of daily.  

Cons: Mood changes, weight gain, and migraines are possible side effects.  Can also cause vaginal discomfort or discharge, and is not available for use by women with certain medical conditions.  Available by prescription only, and can be expensive.

Price: Nuvaring runs around $271 every 3 months.  Currently there is no generic version available, and Nuvaring may or may not be covered by your insurance.  

Again, you should discuss coverage with your insurance company, as the Nuvaring is a distinct class of birth control according to the Department of Health and Human Services, and should be covered by the Affordable Care Act.

 

Implant

Next on the list is the implant–a matchstick-sized plastic rod that is inserted into the arm for up to 4 years to prevent pregnancy.  This rod is implanted underneath the skin in your arm, between your bicep and tricep muscles by a healthcare professional.  It utilizes only progestin to thicken the mucus on your cervix and prevent sperm from reaching your eggs, but also to prevent eggs from leaving your ovaries at all, so there are no eggs to fertilize.  The best part about the implant is that it’s 99.95% effective in actual use cases.  There are no pills to remember, no rings to change out; once the implant is inserted, you can forget all about it.  The insertion process is fairly simple, as well.  They’ll make a small incision in your arm after providing some Lidocaine to numb the area, and will use a small tool to insert the rod through the incision.  Then you’ll receive some bandages to help the area heal and prevent infection, and away you go.  The process will usually result in some bruising around the incision area, and minor itching as it heals.  Once inserted, you can feel the rod through your skin with your fingers, but should not notice the implant unless you are looking for it.  All told, the process takes about 10-15 minutes to complete.

Because the implant does not use estrogen, it is a good option for women who may have experienced problems on other forms of hormonal birth control.  It also can cut down on period cramps and shorten your period, or eliminate it altogether.  It’s also easily removed by a healthcare professional, so you can get pregnant relatively quickly after removal if you are ready for that step.  Some women experience negative side effects when first trying out the implant, but most tend to go away after a cycle or two.  Most common is irregular bleeding or spotting, and some women experience heavier periods than normal.  There can also be headaches, nausea, weight gain, or ovarian cysts, but these are less common side effects. 

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Allows for reduced condom use, reduces acne, lighten and shorten periods, requires insertion/removal only once every 3-4 years.

Cons: Mood changes, weight gain, and migraines are possible side effects, as well as heavier periods and a small risk of ovarian cysts.  Must be inserted by healthcare professional.

Price: The cost of the implant ranges from $0 - $800 upfront.  The Affordable Care Act means the implant should not cost anything upfront for women with insurance, but may cost up to $800 for those without coverage.  You can always speak to the provider about a payment plan to help cover the cost if necessary.

 

Because the implant does not use estrogen, it is a good option for women who may have experienced problems on other forms of hormonal birth control.

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Intrauterine Device (IUD)

The IUD is a small t-shaped piece of flexible plastic placed inside the uterus to prevent pregnancy. There are 2 types of IUDs available–copper and hormonal.  The copper IUD only comes in one brand called ParaGard – it has no hormones, is wrapped in a small amount of copper, and inserted to prevent pregnancy for up to 12 years.  The hormonal IUDs (Liletta, Mirena, Skyla, and Kyleena) use progestin to prevent pregnancy and last between 3 and 6 years.  An IUD prevents pregnancy by preventing sperm from ever reaching your eggs to fertilize.  Copper is essentially a ‘sperm deterrent,’ so sperm never reaches your eggs.  Hormonal IUDs utilize progestin to thicken the mucus of your cervix walls to trap sperm and prevent them from reaching the egg, and also by preventing your ovaries from releasing eggs at all.

IUDs must be inserted by health-care professionals.  During your appointment, you’ll receive an exam of your vagina, cervix, and uterus and probably offered some pain medicine prior to insertion to help numb and open your cervix.  The nurse or doctor will insert a speculum in your vagina, and use a special inserter to put the IUD through the opening of your cervix and into your uterus, with 1 to 2 inches of string exiting your cervix for removal later (which you can also use to insure the IUD is still in place – but don’t pull on the strings, you could dislodge the IUD).  The whole process takes less than 5 minutes.  You may feel mild cramps or pain during and after the insertion, but they should last only a short time.  Dizziness is also possible right after the procedure, with a small chance of fainting, so you may want to ask someone to come with you to the appointment to help get you home.   The copper IUD is 99.4% effective in perfect use and 99.2% effective in actual use, while hormonal IUDs are 99.9% effective in both perfect and actual use cases. 

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Allows for reduced condom use, reduces acne, lighten and shorten periods, can reduce anemia, requires insertion/removal only once every 3-12 years, the copper IUD is the most effective emergency contraception if inserted within 120 hours (5 days) of unprotected sex.

Cons: Mood changes, weight gain, and migraines are possible side effects, as well as heavier periods and spotting.  There can be some cramps or backaches for a few days after insertion, and some pain during the insertion process.   Some people feel the strings of an IUD that exit through the cervix during intercourse.

Price: The cost of the implant ranges from $0 - $1,000 upfront.  The Affordable Care Act means the implant should not cost anything upfront for women with insurance, but may cost up to $1,000 for those without coverage.  You can always speak to the provider about a payment plan to help cover the cost if necessary.

 

Shot

The Depo-Provera shot is an injection in the arm or butt that prevents pregnancy for up to 3 months.  The shot utilizes progestin, like most other methods listed above, to prevent pregnancy by preventing eggs from leaving the ovaries and thickening the mucus in the cervix wall to prevent sperm from reaching the ovaries.  Depo-Provera is 99.95% effective in perfect use cases and 97% effective in actual use–this has to do with the timing of the shots, and ensuring you get a new shot every 3 months without any added time.  The shot is an effective longer-term contraception option with no daily, weekly, or monthly medication to remember.  Some women report feeling more spontaneous on the shot with an increased sex drive.  It does not contain estrogen, which can be a problem for many women in hormonal birth control, and can also help prevent cancer in the lining of the uterus.  As for disadvantages, some women experience irregular bleeding and spotting, longer or heavier periods, change in sex drive, changes in appetite or weight gain, mood swings, hair loss or increased hair on the face/body, headaches, and nausea.  For these side effects, it’s possible they will last until your shot wears off, in 12-14 weeks, so they may last quite a bit longer than side effects from other methods of birth control.  Additionally, in the rare cases where the shot fails, a resulting pregnancy is likely to be ectopic, which can be a life-threatening situation. 

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Allows for reduced condom use, reduces acne, lighten and shorten periods, can reduce anemia, requires new injections only ever 3 months.

Cons: Mood changes, weight gain, and migraines are possible side effects, as well as heavier periods and spotting.  Hair loss or added hair on the face/body are possible, and ectopic pregnancies are more likely should this method fail.

Price: Cost ranges from $0 - $250 the first time, when you’d need an exam as well.  After the initial exam, the cost is somewhere between $0 and $150 for each following injection, unless you also need a pregnancy test (when you’re more than 2 weeks late for an injection).  This method should be covered under the Affordable Care Act for women with insurance coverage.  

 

Sponge

The sponge is a plastic foam that contains spermicide and is about 2 inches in diameter.  It is inserted into the vagina before intercourse, and removed using an attached nylon loop after sex.  Currently, the Today Sponge is the only version available in the United States.  The sponge works by both covering the cervix so no sperm can reach any eggs, and by releasing spermicide continuously to prevent sperm from moving at all.  The sponge is about 80% effective in perfect use and 68% effective in actual use for women who have already had children, but 91% effective in perfect use and 84% effective in actual use in women who have not yet had children.  The sponge does not contain any hormones, and is small enough to carry in a purse or pocket.  It also is rarely felt by women or their partners during intercourse, and can be inserted several hours before sex, and left in for up to 30 hours after sex.  It can be used as many times as you like within the first 24 hours of insertion without removal.  As a downside, it can be difficult to insert or remove, and can break into smaller pieces, which may require a visit to a healthcare professional to fully remove.  It can cause vaginal irritation, or may even make intercourse too messy or too dry. 

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Easy to carry around, does not disrupt intercourse by being wearable for up to 30 hours, and is inexpensive.

Cons: Low effective rate in actual use cases, can make intercourse too messy or dry, and can be difficult to remove.

Price: Cost goes up to about $15 for a package of three sponges.

 

Cervical Cap

This is a silicone cup, shaped like a sailor’s hat, that’s inserted into the vagina over the cervix to prevent pregnancy.  FemCap is the only brand currently available in the United States.  Cervical caps must be used with spermicide cream or jelly in order to be fully effective–it covers the opening to the uterus to prevent sperm from getting in, and the spermicide prevents the sperm from moving.  For effectiveness, the cervical cap is 74% effective in perfect use and 68% effective in actual use for women who have had kids, and 91% effective in perfect use and 84% effective in actual use in women who have not had children.  The cervical cap is small enough to be carried in a pocket or purse, cannot generally be felt by you or your partner, and is both immediately effective and reversible.  There’s no hormones, and doesn’t interrupt intercourse because it can be inserted several hours before sex.  However, it cannot be used during menstruation, and can be difficult to insert for some women.  Certain sexual positions or penis sizes can push the cap out of place, and the cap must be in place every time you have intercourse to be effective.

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Easy to carry around, does not disrupt intercourse because it can be inserted several hours before intercourse, and is inexpensive.

Cons: Low effective rate in actual use cases, can be pushed aside during some intercourse, and can be difficult to insert.

Price: Cost goes up to about $75 depending on the kind you purchase, plus the cost of spermicide or jelly.

 

Diaphragm

A diaphragm is a shallow, dome-shaped piece of silicon with a flexible rim, which is inserted into the vagina to block the opening to the uterus to prevent pregnancy.  A diaphragm must be used in conjunction with spermicide jelly or cream to be effective.   A diaphragm with spermicide is effective at 94% in perfect use cases, and at 84% in actual use cases. A diaphragm, much like a cervical cap or sponge, is small enough to be carried in a pocket or purse, cannot generally be felt during intercourse, and is immediately effective and reversible.  There’s also no interruption of intercourse, as a diaphragm can be inserted several hours beforehand.  However, a diaphragm can be difficult to insert, may be pushed out of place by certain sexual positions, may need to be refitted, and must be in place every time a woman has vaginal intercourse.  Additionally, a diaphragm must be fitted by a health care provider during an exam, meaning your provider will find the correct size, and you’ll have to pick it up as a prescription.

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Easy to carry around, does not disrupt intercourse because it can be inserted several hours before intercourse, and is inexpensive.

Cons: Low effective rate in actual use cases, can be pushed aside during some intercourse, and can be difficult to insert.   Available only via a health care provider.

Price: Cost is anywhere between $0 to $200 for an exam, plus $0 - $75 for the actual diaphragm, as well as the added cost of spermicide as needed.

 

Female Condom

A female condom is a pouch inserted into the vagina to prevent pregnancy.  As a condom, female condoms can help protect you from STIs as well.  The female condom has flexible rings at both ends, and is inserted into the vagina or anus just before intercourse.  Much like a male condom, the female condom works to contain and collect pre-cum and semen, and prevent it from entering the vagina.  Since the open end of the condom covers the exterior portions of genitals, it also can reduce the risk of STIs.  Female condoms are 95% effective in perfect use, and 79% effective in actual use.  Female condoms allow women to share responsibility for preventing STIs, are fairly easy to get as they can be purchased in drugstores or supermarkets, and can be used with both oil-based and water-based lubricants.  There’s no prescription necessary, no hormones to contend with, they can be used as a part of sex play, and will stay in place whether or not your partner maintains an erection.  Female condoms can cause irritation of the vagina, vulva, penis, or anus, though, and they may slip into the vagina during intercourse. T hey could also reduce some feeling during intercourse for both partners.

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Easy to carry around, inexpensive, readily available, helps encourage equality in preventing STIs, can be used as a part of sex play.

Cons: Can cause irritation of the vagina, vulva, penis, or anus, and maybe slip into the vagina or anus during intercourse.  Can reduce some feeling during intercourse, as well.

Price: Cost is about $2-$4 per condom, but may be available for free at local sexual health clinics.  

 

A female condom is a pouch inserted into the vagina to prevent pregnancy and can help protect you from STIs as well.  

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Spermicide

Spermicide is a substance that prevents pregnancy by using chemicals to stop sperm from moving.  It’s available in many different forms, including creams, film, foam, gel, and suppositories.  It can be used alone, or with other methods of birth control, some of which are stated above.  Spermicide is 82% effective in perfect use, and 71% effective in actual use, when used as the only form of contraception.  Spermicide is pretty portable and would fit in your pocket or purse, and can be inserted as a part of sex play; it also does not contain hormones.  It’s commonly available in drugstores or supermarkets and does not require a prescription.  However, it does require use exactly as instructed.If not, the barrier to the cervix may not fully form and be truly effective.  It can also feel messy or leak during intercourse, and may cause some irritation, although switching brands could solve this problem.  The most important side effect is that nonoxynol-9, the most commonly used spermicide in the United States, can cause irritation that increases the risk of exposure to HIV or other STIs when used many times a day.

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Easy to carry around, inexpensive, readily available, can be used as a part of sex play, does not contain hormones.

Cons: Can be messy or leak, requires use exactly according to instructions, and if used too often can lead to increased risks of HIV and other STIs.

Price: Applicator kits for foam and gels average about $8, with refills costing up to $4 each.  Films and suppositories are about $8, as well.

 

Withdrawal

Withdrawal, otherwise known as the pull-out method or coitus interruptus, is when a man will withdraws his penis from the vagina or anus prior to ejaculation to prevent pregnancy by not allowing sperm to enter the vagina.  Withdrawal is relied on by about 35 million couples worldwide, and is 94% effective in perfect use cases.  However, it’s only about 73% effective in actual use cases.  While withdrawal is an option when no other option is available, and is free, there are many disadvantages to consider.  This requires a great amount of self-control, experience, and trust from your partner.  Men who may experience premature ejaculation should not use this method, nor should men who don’t know when to pull out.  This is generally not recommended for teenagers and sexually inexperienced adults as they still learn their bodies and when they will ejaculate.

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Free, available when no other option is available.

Cons: Can be difficult to control, requires great trust and experience, not recommended for couples who may be inexperienced sexually.

Price: Free

 

Sterilization

Sterilization is a surgical procedure for both men and women to permanently prevent pregnancy.  Women have several options: a tubal ligation–where a doctor will surgically tie the fallopian tubes together, and cut them; the tubes can be sealed using electrical current; closed with clips, clamps, or rings; removing a small piece of the tube; or Essure – a small insert will be placed into the tube and tissue will grow around it to block the tube.  All of these methods prevent eggs from traveling through the fallopian tubes to the uterus;without an egg, pregnancy cannot occur.

Men will get a vasectomy.  A healthcare provider will surgically block the tubes that carry sperm, preventing sperm from leaving the male body during intercourse.  A vasectomy can be completed in two ways: incision method and no-incision method.  The incision method uses a local anesthetic, and the doctor makes an incision on each side of the scrotum to reach the tubes that carry sperm.  Each tube is then blocked, usually by removing a small portion of the tube, or tying them together, or closing them off with electrical current.  With the no-incision method, one tiny puncture is made to reach both sets of tubes, which are then tied off, cauterized, or blocked.  This method reduces the possibility of infection, bruising, and other complications.

Sterilization is a permanent procedure.  It allows both sexes to enjoy sex without worrying about unwanted pregnancy, which can in turn increase the joy of intercourse due to the lack of worry.  It does not change your hormones, and will not cause early menopause.  Most women will still have normal periods, as well.  It will not affect the ability of men to get or stay erect, and will not affect sexual pleasure.  Sterilization is a great option for people who do not want to have biological children (any more or at all),  don’t want to pass on hereditary illness or disability, for women whose health could be threatened by a pregnancy, or to prevent your partner having to go through the sterilization procedure themselves. However, sterilization is in fact permanent, and is not meant to be undone, and may not be able to be undone at all.  As with all medical procedures, surgery has risks of complications that should be discussed with your doctor beforehand. 

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Permanent, no permanent changes to hormones or sex drive.

Cons: Cannot generally be undone, is a surgical procedure with typical risks associated with surgery.

Price: Women’s sterilization can cost upwards of $6,000, but a vasectomy ranges somewhere closer to $1,000 (depending on insurance coverage).

 

Morning After Pill

If, after you’ve used birth control or not, you find yourself in a situation where you aren’t sure if your contraception method was effective, there is emergency contraception to consider.  The morning-after pill is birth control you can use up to 5 days after intercourse to prevent a pregnancy.  As discussed previously, the ParaGard IUD is an option here, as well.  As for the morning-after pill, there are two kinds.  Pills with ulipristal acetate, called ella, or pills with levonorgestrel, which includes Plan B One Step, Next Choice One Dose, Take Action, My Way, AfterPill, and others. ella requires a prescription, but you can get a fast medical consultation and prescription with next day delivery at www.ella-kwikmed.com.  It’s the most effective morning-after pill, and can be taken up to 5 days after intercourse (and works just as well on day 5 as it does on day 1).  If you’ve used the pill, patch, or ring within the last 5 days, though, it may not be as effective as other methods of emergency contraception.

The other kind of pill, with levonorgestrel, does not require a prescription.  They can be bought over the counter in most drugstores and pharmacies, and work best within 72 hours after intercourse.  The sooner you take the pills, the better they work.  They are not the abortion pill – if you are already pregnant, the morning-after will won’t affect your pregnancy.  However, it should not be used as a regular form of birth control, because it’s not as effective as a regular, non-emergency birth control methods.

Because sperm can live in the body for up to six days after sex, emergency contraception works by temporarily stopping your body from releasing an egg during that time.  If you’ve already started ovulating, however, emergency contraception may not prevent pregnancy.  This is why it’s important to get emergency contraception as soon as possible after intercourse.

 

The breakdown:

Pros: Can be used as a backup when birth control fails, or you weren’t able to use birth control; works up to 5 days after unprotected sex; will not affect an existing pregnancy

Cons: Can be stressful to deal with the need to use emergency contraception, can be tough to get in certain areas of the country, not for use as regular contraception

Price: Ranges in price from $20 to $60, generally.

 

Abstinence

Abstinence is the practice of not having sex at all. It is the most effective method of preventing pregnancy and STIs, at 100% if practiced in full.  It’s a method used by many people for many reasons.  Abstinence is free, and does not add any extra hormones to your body.  Additionally, women who abstain until their 20s, and who have fewer partners in their lifetimes, may be less likely to get STIs, which means they are also less likely to become infertile or develop cervical cancer.  However, many people find it difficult to abstain for long periods of time, either due to changing hormones, inability to control their urges, or just the desire to feel connected to another person.

 

The breakdown:

Pros: 100% effective, free, can lead to better health outcomes for women.

Cons: Can be hard to maintain due to societal pressures, hormonal changes, or need to feel connected to others.

Price: Free

 

With all of these contraceptive options available, it can be overwhelming to make a decision on what is best for you and your body.  This article should be used as a primer to understand what options are out there, and the possible effects they could have. This information should be taken to your doctor or healthcare provider so that you can ask more questions, run through your options, and really get the best contraceptive for your situation.  For women, there will likely be a lot of trial and error before you find something that’s just right for you.  As you get older, you may find you want something different, and as your relationships change, you may decide it’s time to stop birth control to have a family, or select a permanent birth control option instead.  No matter what you chose, make sure you have all the information.  Don’t be afraid to ask questions, to switch methods, and to find a doctor who’s willing to have that conversation with you before writing you a prescription.  It’s a big world, and there’s a lot to learn, but with the beauty of the internet and a great doctor, you can find something that works great for you. 

 

Courtnie is a licensed attorney and the Member Engagement Manager at WeWork. She’s a Chicagoan in New York City, with a deep love for live music, sports, and craft beer. With her husband of 3 years, Courtnie is raising 2 fur-babies and finding her path in life.

 

Comments (1)

  1. Meagan Hooper

Fabulous post!

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